Universal Perspectives

A world class education begins with access to ideas that can transform learners. Higher education must challenge students to reach their full potential. Exploring beyond what students already know to dive into depths beyond the shore of their existing knowledge is the objective of higher education. This semester I went on a quest with our graduate students to learn more about early childhood assessment by hosting an international expert, Dr. Carmen Dionne.

Dr. Dionne shared her ideas and research on early childhood assessment. She brought up so many topics related to the challenges and opportunities we all face as researchers. Faculty in the School of Teacher Education, my Dean and Research Dean, and our talented graduate students in the College of Community Innovation and Education participated in the Research Symposium. Dr. Dionne is Professor at the University of Québec at Trois-Rivières, and she is the sole United Nations Educational, Cultural and Scientific Organization (UNESCO) Chair in Child Development with a focus on screening and assessment of young children. The purpose of the UNESCO program she chairs is to conduct research in early childhood intervention for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers who are at risk for developing a disability or have disabilities.

Thank you to Dr. Dionne for coming all this way to Orlando from Quebec. A BIG thank you goes to the University of Central Florida College of Graduate Studies and UNESCO for sponsoring our research symposium with Dr. Dionne. The research symposium with Dr. Dionne has given us the opportunity to reflect upon ways to improve the world for young children and their families.  Reaching past our direct sphere of influence leads to transformation that comes from learning about the immense world around us and global perspectives.

If you’d like to read more about the UNESCO child development chair, follow this link:

https://oraprdnt.uqtr.uquebec.ca/pls/public/gscw031?owa_no_site=1530&owa_no_fiche=4&owa_bottin=

Save the Date flyer Dr. Dionne March 4 2019.JPG

What's New?

Happy New Year! I hope your new year is off to a great start. In 2018, my colleagues and I will be putting the finishing touches on the new edition of the Assessment, Evaluation, and Programming System for Infants and Children (AEPS®).

We have been working on the AEPS®-3 since 2005 and I’m thrilled to see it going into production. Early childhood professionals can benefit from having a measure to assess young children that also links to a curriculum that could be used during play and routines. The AEPS®-3 Family component can be used to create positive and engaging partnerships with parents. Some of the most exciting new things in the AEPS®-3 are the early childhood math and reading areas.

Listen in to my iTunes show to hear a conversation with the pioneer of the AEPS® Dr. Diane Bricker (pictured below) talk about how she got started in our field, early childhood theoretical perspectives based on the work of Skinner and Piaget, and the influences and impact of her work in the area of early childhood assessment. 

If you would like professional development on the new AEPS®-3, start now. You can email me at marisamacy@gmail.com to begin. Wishing you all the best in 2018!

Left row: Carmen Dionne (Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières), Amy Perkins (Brookes Publishing), Naomi Rahn (Wisconsin DOE), Diane Bricker (University of Oregon), that's me in green - Marisa Macy (University of Central Florida), and I-Ching Chen (Kent State University). Right row: Sarah Zerofsky (Brookes Publishing), Misti Waddell (University of Oregon),  Jennifer Grisham-Brown (University of Kentucky),  Joann Johnson (St. Cloud University), and Heather Shrestha (Brookes Publishing)

Left row: Carmen Dionne (Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières), Amy Perkins (Brookes Publishing), Naomi Rahn (Wisconsin DOE), Diane Bricker (University of Oregon), that's me in green - Marisa Macy (University of Central Florida), and I-Ching Chen (Kent State University). Right row: Sarah Zerofsky (Brookes Publishing), Misti Waddell (University of Oregon),  Jennifer Grisham-Brown (University of Kentucky),  Joann Johnson (St. Cloud University), and Heather Shrestha (Brookes Publishing)

 

Below is a PDF of our “Sneak Preview” my co-authors and I presented at a national conference. 

http://aepsinteractive.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/DEC-AEPS-3-Presentation-2017.pdf 

http://www.brookespublishing.com/resource-center/screening-and-assessment/aeps/

Lights, Camera, Action!

Since World War II, ethical standards for conducting research with human participants has been evolving. Researchers affiliated with a university MUST get approval from their institutions’ Internal Review Board BEFORE beginning a study with human participants. Outside of academia there may be different processes and standards for conducting research with human participants. If this topic is of interest to you, consider reading a book by Rebecca Skloot about the evolution of research on a human subject by the name: Henrietta Lacks.

The human cells are referred to as HeLa for the first two letters of the participant’s first and last names. Skloot tells the story of how cells taken from Lacks in 1951, without her permission, have been used widespread by scientists all over the world for several decades to learn more about a range of conditions including polio and cancer. This fascinating story is going to be told on HBO this month. Oprah Winfrey plays the daughter of Henrietta Lacks who shares the impact the research on HeLa cells has had on her life and of other members of the Lacks family. Do you hear that sound? That’s me setting my DVR. I can’t wait to see this movie!

Skloot, R. (2010). The immortal life of Henrietta Lacks. New York: Crown Publishing Group.